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Dementia, Stimulating Memories Through The Beauty of Art Therapy

Some people with dementia can communicate their thoughts and stimulate memories through the beauty of art.

The new-born artist with Alzheimer’s disease is participating in “Remembrance Memories”, a national art project by the Alzheimer’s Association, financed by several offices countrywide. The art project helps people who show signs of dementia (tegn på dement) communicate their thoughts and feelings through a piece of art, sketching, and other artistic projects.

Ruth Drew of the Alzheimer’s Association said: “They don’t appear to want or can’t talk, but they can draw something that keeps us stare in awe.” “In an environment of peace and quiet, they occasionally appear to be clear and can express their feelings which can come as a shock to many. “

She said that these organized art courses help provide those suffering dementia “good time, good minutes, and hours of the day.” “When people get involved and get support, they may sleep better, not so anxious, not so depressed. The art experience continues throughout the day.” And, eventually, the goal to have as many “happy humans” is just an arm away.

Gaining Creativity In Place of Loss Language

Many professionals understand that art can certainly help individuals with dementia communicate their feelings. Creative art includes a different area of the brain from what is used for language.

A professor of neurology in California has determined from studies that creativeness could arise in people who have dementia, based upon where it generally impacts the brain.

In the event that dementia is set at the left of the brain, the patient will experience eventual language loss.

“But it can produce huge visual creativity – in some cases through sculpture or painting, or in some cases, they become overly passionate with gardening. The gradual change can be at the same time beautiful and sometimes sad.”

Given that the brain degrades with time, the newly discovered artistic ability gets to its peak and after that declines.

“We believe that with patients who have language loss due to dementia, the visual part of the brain is not anymore covered up by the verbal side, which enables their visual imagination to be unveiled.” “We now have proof from functional imaging that it’s now happening.”

With the help of well-trained moderators, even those who have no artistic ability in the past can find their way to art. Those who have been engaged in artistic creation can feel comforted when going back to their skills. No matter what the background of the creator is, art can portray memories in the life of the artist before dementia has stricken.